Citadelle Gin

The Ageing Techniques

Ageing alcohol in barrels enriches the sensorial characteristics of a spirit, and rounds out its volatile components. The tannins in the wood provide a light bitterness, which is important for the aromatic balance. Launched in 2008, Citadelle Réserve signals the renaissance of Golden Gins. Our team is constantly researching materials and methods and likes to push the limits of the ageing process. With Citadelle Réserve, Alexandre Gabriel experiments with ancestral ageing techniques by selecting singular wood species with forgotten flavor characteristics. Six types of cask are employed in the ageing process of Citadelle Réserve:

Acacia: The dominant wood used. It lends freshness and a minty appeal, as well as all the smoothness of Citadelle Réserve. It gives Citadelle its green nuances.
Mulberry: Gives a touch of acidity, immediately followed by a silky sensation in the mouth. On the botanical side, we taste violet and wild berries.
Cherrywood: with a powerfully enveloping effect, it is used parsimoniously in the ageing process. Offers hints of fresh hazelnut and red fruits.
Chestnut: provides structure, with tannins providing a just balance between roundness and bitterness.
French oak having contained Pineau de Charentes: for oxygenation and for preserving the intrinsic freshness of the gin and adding an element of sweetness.
French oak having contained Cognac: the old tannins in the wood round out the aromatic characteristics of the gin.

This ageing technique, which takes five months, reveals all the complexity of Citadelle Réserve, with each barrel contributing a unique component.

But Citadelle’s singularity is also due to its blending.
After time in the different casks, the gin is blended in a patented wood receptacle in the form of an egg. We are the first and only gin in the world to use this method. The oval shape is ideal for obtaining perfect integration of the different wood essences. At 2.45 meters high, and with the help of natural convection, the gin inside is in a state of perpetual motion. This slow and constant blending process is the key to the perfect integration of Citadelle Réserve and gives it its harmonious character.
With too much contact with oxygen, a certain number of the very volatile aromatic components evaporates; this blending egg enables us to reduce oxygenation and preserve the palette of aromas.

Ageing

Ageing

Ageing techniques


Ageing alcohol in barrels enriches the sensorial characteristics of a spirit, and rounds out its volatile components. The tannins in the wood provide a light bitterness, which is important for the aromatic balance. Launched in 2008, Citadelle Réserve signals the renaissance of Golden Gins. Our team is constantly researching materials and methods and likes to push the limits of the ageing process. With Citadelle Réserve, Alexandre Gabriel experiments with ancestral ageing techniques by selecting singular wood species with forgotten flavor characteristics. Six types of cask are employed in the ageing process of Citadelle Réserve:

Acacia: The dominant wood used. It lends freshness and a minty appeal, as well as all the smoothness of Citadelle Réserve. It gives Citadelle its green nuances.
Mulberry: Gives a touch of acidity, immediately followed by a silky sensation in the mouth. On the botanical side, we taste violet and wild berries.
Cherrywood: with a powerfully enveloping effect, it is used parsimoniously in the ageing process. Offers hints of fresh hazelnut and red fruits.
Chestnut: provides structure, with tannins providing a just balance between roundness and bitterness.
French oak having contained Pineau de Charentes: for oxygenation and for preserving the intrinsic freshness of the gin and adding an element of sweetness.
French oak having contained Cognac: the old tannins in the wood round out the aromatic characteristics of the gin.

This ageing technique, which takes five months, reveals all the complexity of Citadelle Réserve, with each barrel contributing a unique component.

But Citadelle’s singularity is also due to its blending.
After time in the different casks, the gin is blended in a patented wood receptacle in the form of an egg. We are the first and only gin in the world to use this method. The oval shape is ideal for obtaining perfect integration of the different wood essences. At 2.45 meters high, and with the help of natural convection, the gin inside is in a state of perpetual motion. This slow and constant blending process is the key to the perfect integration of Citadelle Réserve and gives it its harmonious character.
With too much contact with oxygen, a certain number of the very volatile aromatic components evaporates; this blending egg enables us to reduce oxygenation and preserve the palette of aromas.


Ageing

Ageing

Ageing techniques

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